Queen turns Windsor into Olympic campsite
Home > News > February 2012 >Queen turns Windsor into Olympic campsite
Her Majesty has agreed that almost 300 pitches will be made available to accommodate up to 1,000 people within the former private hunting ground of Windsor Great Park.

The campsite will run adjacent to the world famous avenue of trees known as Long Walk, which sweeps south from the castle to a bronze statue of King George III on Snow Hill.

Tents, caravans and motor homes will all be welcome at the site for a nominal £40 a night, and a minimum three night stay.

Jon Dale, spokesman for The Camping and Caravanning Club, which will manage the campsite, said: “We are absolutely delighted. It’s a campsite right at the heart of British royalty.

“It’s proving to be an extremely popular option. We only started taking bookings for it this week and the interest has already been phenomenal.

“It’s so close to Windsor Castle and it’s a cheaper alternative in terms of other accommodation. From where the campsite is you can actually see the top of Windsor Castle.”

The initial structure where Windsor Castle now sits was built by William the Conqueror in the 11th century as a defensive stronghold to protect the River Thames.

Much of the surrounding area which makes up Windsor Great Park today was reserved by the King to supply his court with deer, boar, fish and wood.

Now the park is managed by the Crown Estate and consists of 5,000 acres of gently undulating landscape incorporating giant, solitary oak trees, small woods and formal gardens. It lies to the south of the town of Windsor, on the border of Berkshire and Surrey.

Yesterday, officials revealed that the planned campsite would be open to all and would operate for a month from July 20 to August 16.

In total, 286 pitches will be available and campers will also benefit from an on-site catering team selling food from the Royal Farms on the Windsor estate.

Visitors will be within two miles of Dorney Lake in Eton, which is the Olympic 2012 venue for rowing, flat water canoeing and kayaking events.

And a series of arts and open-air theatre events, including a performance of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, has also been arranged.

Mr Dale, 34, said the £40 a night fee to camp was a bargain compared with figures of up to £200 a night for hotels in Windsor over the Olympics.

He added: “We’re expecting it to sell out in double-quick time”.

Philip Everett, Deputy Ranger at Windsor Great Park, said: “The Crown Estate is delighted to be working with The Camping and Caravanning Club to help provide this unique campsite in Windsor Great Park.

“Not only is it close to the Olympic events at Dorney Lake, but it is the ideal base from which to explore this fantastic area.”

Back to news list